Alpha-Beta of Meditation

The Alpha-Beta of Meditation: A Story of Transformation

The Alpha-Beta of Meditation: Accessing the ‘Third Force’

This is a story of transformation—from chaos to peace, from perceived strength to true strength. It is how a simple shift in my behavior made me more creative and improved my productivity. It is about moving from an “alpha” state of being (high intensity awareness, focus, execution, contraction) to a “beta” one of calm, cool, relaxed, and expanded. And if it sounds like this is a sales pitch, it is, in a way, except you don’t need any money or equipment or even a dogmatic belief system. You just need to open yourself to a new possibility of being.



I’ve always known of meditation, of course, but hadn’t ever given it much thought. I understood it to be some kind of belief system for other more “holistic” people.



As an alpha-male achiever, I thought meditation basically involved sitting cross-legged and humming. I didn’t get the value of that, and instead, focused on organizing my work and slaying the immediate tasks in front of me.



It was far more natural for me to push myself to work harder and go faster than it was for me to slow down and contemplate. Somehow, being busy had become a badge of honor for me as a “man of action.” Acceleration was the answer to every problem. Sensory overload only existed for weaker minds. But simply working harder became a clutter of confusion when my art and other creative output did not go exactly as I had planned. My emotions have always been a powerful source of inspiration, but they could also become a prison of anxiety when they were not controlled, causing me to lose perspective. That, in turn, affected my work, my relationships and my own state of well-being.


My own false narratives resulted in anxiety and unattainable idealism. All my personal frustrations were manufactured from the one-dimensional projection of my own cognitive biases.


I was addicted to order but my life felt chaotic. Something had to change.




I have been married to my wife, Tasha, for 20 years. Several years ago, she began to explore her own practice of meditation and contemplation. I admired her, but didn’t have time or space for meditation myself. I operated in a dualistic mindset of being awake and working or being asleep and not working.


But as a results-oriented achiever, I noticed that Tasha experiencing something entirely new. She was lapping me when it came to her creative flow, her ease of being, her peace of mind. I wanted some of that.


I asked her to lead me on my own journey that would enable me to access the beta state of meditation. It was difficult at first because I was used to conquering what I wanted. That is not what meditation is. Meditation is the art of letting go. I would fidget, get bored, worry if I was doing it right. But over time, I released my self-imposed constraints and began to slowly expand my mind. By methodically building my own disciplined practice of meditation I became aware of a dynamic “third force.”


This third force was neither awake nor asleep; i was a transcendent state of both. Eventually, I realized this state allowed me to reframe a problem without a dualistic “black or white” solution. It expanded my consciousness and opened my mind to new ways of thinking.



Meditation is the foundation I use to deconstruct my creative process, increase possibilities and explore unexpected solutions. It is a connection of my mind, body and spirit that fuels my creativity. This disciplined practice has become not only my oasis within, but also the single greatest catalyst to amplify my creative output.



Before I go on stage, I sit motionless, alone, without distraction. I relax into a space of expanded consciousness. I access my deeper desire to be authentic, raw, vulnerable and transparent. I surrender my ego. I use deep mindful breathing to find the heartbeat of the audience, the energy, the rhythm of the ambience of the molecules in the room.


As a result of my meditation discipline in the last two years, my performances have dramatically improved. I didn’t change the discipline of my research, rehearsal or content. I simply changed my state of being before I take the stage.


Now I am far more relaxed and connected to my audience in a meaningful way. I let go of the need for my presentation to be an impressive lecture filled with knowledge and actionable content, and latched on to making it a real authentic audience experience. I am tuned in to the crowd and their responses in a way I never was before. My show has become a dynamic process of exploration and adaptation that we share.



My thoughts feel more like a beautiful new language that is less rational and more metaphorical.


My mind is able to access an alchemistic mental state, in which I can absorb ideas and deflect distractions at the same time. It feels much more like I have unlocked a key to becoming more self aware or emotionally intelligent.


I am much more calm under pressure and more resilient to stress. I am able to both expand and contract. Dream, then execute. Imagine, then focus. I am able to see a bigger picture in mind while reducing clutter.


Now in my meditation, I am moving forward, yet not toward a finish line. There’s no “winning” or status to attain. It is the disciplined practice of boundless curiosity that opens me up to being willing to fall again and again without ever giving up. And that, ironically, feels like winning.

Alpha-Beta of Meditation

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